Inheriting More Than Language

When the architects and craftsmen of medieval Europe built their churches—stone, wood, and stained glass—they designed them with names for the various areas and parts and structures. The area that was reserved for the congregation to gather in worship was called the ship. They didn't think it a strange name. For centuries, Christian writers had … Continue reading Inheriting More Than Language

Tears In A Bottle: C.S. Lewis’ “A Grief Observed”

You record my lamentation; put my tears into your bottle. Are not these things noted in your book? —Psalm 56 In April of 1956, C.S. Lewis was married to Joy Davidman in a registry office. On Lewis' part, it was largely meant as an act of charity, allowing Davidman and her two sons to escape … Continue reading Tears In A Bottle: C.S. Lewis’ “A Grief Observed”

You Are All My Friends: C.S. Lewis’ “The Four Loves”

In 1958, C.S. Lewis was asked by an American Christian radio station to record a series of talks. The subject he chose was Love. The talks were duly recorded, but—in an almost farcical irony—the Brit proved too liberal for the Americans; the Episcopalian bishops supervising the project were scandalized at how frankly Lewis had discussed … Continue reading You Are All My Friends: C.S. Lewis’ “The Four Loves”

The Particularity of Poetry

I recently took part in a conversation around the role of aesthetics in faith, and the famous (or infamous) piece "Footprints" came up. While there are people who take genuine comfort from it, most of my friends find it sentimental and cheesy. It's often the butt of jokes. But it's also possible that few of … Continue reading The Particularity of Poetry

Knowing Ourselves

The ancient Greeks held the Pythia, priestess of the temple of Apollo and commonly known as the Oracle of Delphi, in the highest regard. She occupied perhaps the most important religious position in the Greek world, said to be in direct communion with Apollo himself, delivering the god's responses to supplicants' questions in dactylic hexameters. … Continue reading Knowing Ourselves

All That We Think Is Love: C.S. Lewis’ “Till We Have Faces”

It's almost a sure bet that if people have heard of C.S. Lewis, then they've read The Chronicles of Narnia. Occasionally they haven't, but such cases are rare enough that people generally assume others know the stories. When conversations about him start up the question that's usually asked is "Have you read the Cosmic Trilogy?" … Continue reading All That We Think Is Love: C.S. Lewis’ “Till We Have Faces”