I And Thou: Ursula K. Le Guin’s “The Left Hand of Darkness”

Science fiction as we know it was born in the 1930s and 40s, a time of social and political crisis for many in the world. When people weren't certain if they would see tomorrow, stories about the future often became an outlet for the fears and concerns of the present. Isaac Asimov's Foundation series, for … Continue reading I And Thou: Ursula K. Le Guin’s “The Left Hand of Darkness”

Spirit And Nature: C.S. Lewis’ “Miracles”

Miracles: A Preliminary Study is C.S. Lewis' third major work of Christian apologetics—and also his last. He became known as an apologist first through The Problem of Pain and then through his radio broadcasts which later became Mere Christianity. Both of these projects were published during the war, and Miracles itself started growing during those … Continue reading Spirit And Nature: C.S. Lewis’ “Miracles”

Men Without Chests: C.S. Lewis’ “That Hideous Strength”

That Hideous Strength, the third book in C.S. Lewis' Cosmic Trilogy, is often noted for being rather different than the first two. It is longer by far, it is set entirely on Earth, and Elwin Ransom is not the main character. But in fact the novel continues exploring many of the themes and ideas already … Continue reading Men Without Chests: C.S. Lewis’ “That Hideous Strength”

As Real As What You Love: C.S. Lewis’ “The Great Divorce”

It is difficult, at first, to classify The Great Divorce. On the one hand it isn't a non-fiction work of apologetics or theology. But on the other hand, the story is so slight that it hardly counts as a straightforward novel; certainly the narrative is much less involved than any part of the Cosmic Trilogy … Continue reading As Real As What You Love: C.S. Lewis’ “The Great Divorce”

A New Theology: C.S. Lewis’ “Perelandra”

With the first book in his Cosmic Trilogy, Out of the Silent Planet, C.S. Lewis seems to have tried to invent a new Christian mythology—or as he once put it, "smuggle theology" into readers' minds under the guise of science fiction. For the second book, theology is no longer hidden; it comes right to the … Continue reading A New Theology: C.S. Lewis’ “Perelandra”

Learning By Loving: James K.A. Smith’s “Desiring The Kingdom”

James K.A. Smith’s Desiring the Kingdom: Worship, Worldview, and Cultural Formation is the first volume of his Cultural Liturgies trilogy, a series which ultimately comprises a theology of culture. He opens the book with a question: "What is education for? And more specifically, what is at stake in a distinctively Christian education?" This comes, he … Continue reading Learning By Loving: James K.A. Smith’s “Desiring The Kingdom”

The Same Road: C.S. Lewis’ “Mere Christianity”

Aside from The Chronicles of Narnia, C.S. Lewis' most famous and widely-read book is probably Mere Christianity. It is certainly the reason that most people think of him primarily as a Christian apologist. As World War II raged on in the 1940s, Lewis gave several talks on BBC Radio on the arguments in favour of … Continue reading The Same Road: C.S. Lewis’ “Mere Christianity”

C.S. Lewis’ “The Weight of Glory”

The titular sermon of this collection contains one of the most quoted passages in C.S. Lewis' writings. How often has a preacher wrapped up a sermon with the bit about how we're satisfied making mudpies in a slum because we don't know what it means to play on the seashore? It is often such a … Continue reading C.S. Lewis’ “The Weight of Glory”

The Bureaucrat On Your Shoulder: C.S. Lewis’ “The Screwtape Letters”

It was triggered, apparently, by a boring sermon. C.S. Lewis had been sick for weeks and was finally well enough to attend a Wednesday service at his Anglican church. The homily was delivered by a guest and he found it painfully dull, so his mind began to wander. It wandered to the point of imagining … Continue reading The Bureaucrat On Your Shoulder: C.S. Lewis’ “The Screwtape Letters”