The Family of God: Living Theology Through Sacramental Worship

I wrote this essay a couple of weeks ago for my theology class, by chance one of the last assignments in my Master's program. I recognize that it's a bit longer than the usual post, but decided to go ahead because I believe the topic is one worthy of (much) further discussion. Far from holding … Continue reading The Family of God: Living Theology Through Sacramental Worship

A New Theology: C.S. Lewis’ “Perelandra”

With the first book in his Cosmic Trilogy, Out of the Silent Planet, C.S. Lewis seems to have tried to invent a new Christian mythology—or as he once put it, "smuggle theology" into readers' minds under the guise of science fiction. For the second book, theology is no longer hidden; it comes right to the … Continue reading A New Theology: C.S. Lewis’ “Perelandra”

Learning By Loving: James K.A. Smith’s “Desiring The Kingdom”

James K.A. Smith’s Desiring the Kingdom: Worship, Worldview, and Cultural Formation is the first volume of his Cultural Liturgies trilogy, a series which ultimately comprises a theology of culture. He opens the book with a question: "What is education for? And more specifically, what is at stake in a distinctively Christian education?" This comes, he … Continue reading Learning By Loving: James K.A. Smith’s “Desiring The Kingdom”

Subversion By Submission: The Creativity of Women’s Theological Discourse

It’s not a surprising assertion to say that women have often been silenced and neglected in the realm of theological discourse. Even when you can hold up one or two examples, an even richer and broader heritage of women’s voices goes under-read, under-appreciated, and under-cited. (Not that this little essay will do anything to fix … Continue reading Subversion By Submission: The Creativity of Women’s Theological Discourse

The Same Road: C.S. Lewis’ “Mere Christianity”

Aside from The Chronicles of Narnia, C.S. Lewis' most famous and widely-read book is probably Mere Christianity. It is certainly the reason that most people think of him primarily as a Christian apologist. As World War II raged on in the 1940s, Lewis gave several talks on BBC Radio on the arguments in favour of … Continue reading The Same Road: C.S. Lewis’ “Mere Christianity”

C.S. Lewis’ “The Weight of Glory”

The titular sermon of this collection contains one of the most quoted passages in C.S. Lewis' writings. How often has a preacher wrapped up a sermon with the bit about how we're satisfied making mudpies in a slum because we don't know what it means to play on the seashore? It is often such a … Continue reading C.S. Lewis’ “The Weight of Glory”

The Bureaucrat On Your Shoulder: C.S. Lewis’ “The Screwtape Letters”

It was triggered, apparently, by a boring sermon. C.S. Lewis had been sick for weeks and was finally well enough to attend a Wednesday service at his Anglican church. The homily was delivered by a guest and he found it painfully dull, so his mind began to wander. It wandered to the point of imagining … Continue reading The Bureaucrat On Your Shoulder: C.S. Lewis’ “The Screwtape Letters”