The Bureaucrat On Your Shoulder: C.S. Lewis’ “The Screwtape Letters”

It was triggered, apparently, by a boring sermon. C.S. Lewis had been sick for weeks and was finally well enough to attend a Wednesday service at his Anglican church. The homily was delivered by a guest and he found it painfully dull, so his mind began to wander. It wandered to the point of imagining … Continue reading The Bureaucrat On Your Shoulder: C.S. Lewis’ “The Screwtape Letters”

Exploring A Question: C.S. Lewis’ “The Problem of Pain”

Though we associate C.S. Lewis most strongly with the field of Christian apologetics, his first publishing ventures were almost purely literary: poetry, novels, and a book on medieval allegory. It was not until 1940, when he had been a Christian for almost a decade, that Lewis published his first book of theology. And like a … Continue reading Exploring A Question: C.S. Lewis’ “The Problem of Pain”

A New Mythology: C.S. Lewis’ “Out of the Silent Planet”

With his first novel, The Pilgrim's Regress, C.S. Lewis tried to revitalize the genre of allegory. His second novel, published in 1938, represents an almost 180-degree turnaround in approach and style. Aiming to craft a narrative rather than an argument, he also abandoned the medieval literary technique for a genre that was considerably more modern … Continue reading A New Mythology: C.S. Lewis’ “Out of the Silent Planet”

Hidden In Plain Sight: C.S. Lewis’ “The Pilgrim’s Regress”

The Pilgrim's Regress was a book of many firsts for C.S. Lewis. It was his first work of prose fiction, his first book as a Christian, and even the first he published under his own name. Despite the noteriety, it remains one of his most unread titles and after getting into it, it's easy to … Continue reading Hidden In Plain Sight: C.S. Lewis’ “The Pilgrim’s Regress”

The Discovery of Ice: Gabriel García Márquez’ “One Hundred Years of Solitude”

Sometimes it's quite difficult to review a book after a single reading when the book is clearly a masterwork of literature that does multiple things at once. It's even more difficult to review a masterwork of literature when everyone already knows it's a masterwork and has written endlessly about it since its original publication. Unless … Continue reading The Discovery of Ice: Gabriel García Márquez’ “One Hundred Years of Solitude”

The Eldritch Horror of A Sleeping Demon: Matt Ruff’s “Lovecraft Country”

"That is not dead which can eternal lie,And with strange aeons even death may die."(H.P. Lovecraft, "The Call of Cthulu") H.P. Lovecraft's stories often present main characters who gradually gain knowledge of Earth's prehistoric past, when Elder Gods ruled and created humans as slaves, and about the evils that lie in wait at the edges … Continue reading The Eldritch Horror of A Sleeping Demon: Matt Ruff’s “Lovecraft Country”

Haunted By The Christmas Spirit: Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol”

Original illustration by John Leech Today marks the 175th anniversary of Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol in Prose: Being a Ghost Story of Christmas (a title commonly shortened). Having bounded to success with The Pickwick Papers, and with Oliver Twist and Nicholas Nickleby under his belt, Dickens was still in the early phase of his career. A Tale of Two Cities, … Continue reading Haunted By The Christmas Spirit: Charles Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol”

Imagining A Memory: Pacific Theatre’s “The Lion, The Witch, And The Wardrobe”

Who would have thought that a wardrobe could contain a world? Who would have thought that four young children would be crowned kings and queens? And who would have thought that a few pieces of furniture, their dust-covers, and a handful of coats were all you needed to bring the past back to life? The … Continue reading Imagining A Memory: Pacific Theatre’s “The Lion, The Witch, And The Wardrobe”